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10.4  Constraints

The constraints that ic_sets implements are the usual relations over sets. The membership (in/2, notin/2) and cardinality constraints (#/2) establish relationships between set variables and integer variables:

?X in ?Set
The integer X is member of the integer set Set
?X notin ?Set
The integer X is not a member of the integer set Set
#(?Set, ?Card)
Card is the cardinality of the integer set Set


Figure 10.2: Membership and Cardinality Constraints




?- X ::[]..[1, 2, 3], 2 in X, 3 in X, #(X, 2).
X = [2, 3]
Yes (0.01s cpu)

?- X :: []..[1, 2, 3, 4], 3 in X, 4 notin X.
X = X{[3] \/ ([] .. [1, 2]) : _2161{1 .. 3}}
Yes (0.00s cpu)
Possible constraints between two sets are equality, inclusion/subset and disjointness:

?- X subset [1, 2, 3, 4].
X = X{([] .. [1, 2, 3, 4]) : _2139{0 .. 4}}
Yes (0.00s cpu)

?- X :: []..[1, 2, 3, 4], Y :: []..[3, 4, 5, 6], X subset Y.
X = X{([] .. [3, 4]) : _2176{0 .. 2}}
Y = Y{([] .. [3, 4, 5, 6]) : _2367{0 .. 4}}
There are 4 delayed goals.
Yes (0.00s cpu)

?- X :: [2] .. [1, 2, 3, 4], Y :: [3] .. [1, 2, 3, 4], X disjoint Y.
X = X{[2] \/ ([] .. [1, 4]) : _2118{1 .. 3}}
Y = Y{[3] \/ ([] .. [1, 4]) : _2213{1 .. 3}}
There are 2 delayed goals.
Yes (0.00s cpu)

?Set1 sameset ?Set2
The sets Set1 and Set2 are equal
?Set1 disjoint ?Set2
The integer sets Set1 and Set2 are disjoint
?Set1 includes ?Set2
Set1 includes (is a superset) of the integer set Set2
?Set1 subset ?Set2
Set1 is a (non-strict) subset of the integer set Set2
intersection(?Set1, ?Set2, ?Set3)
Set3 is the intersection of the integer sets Set1 and Set2
union(?Set1, ?Set2, ?Set3)
Set3 is the union of the integer sets Set1 and Set2
difference(?Set1, ?Set2, ?Set3)
Set3 is the difference of the integer sets Set1 and Set2
symdiff(?Set1, ?Set2, ?Set3)
Set3 is the symmetric difference of the integer sets Set1 and Set2


Figure 10.3: Basic Set Relations



Possible constraints between three sets are for example intersection, union, difference and symmetric difference. For example:

?- X :: [2, 3] .. [1, 2, 3, 4],
   Y :: [3, 4] .. [3, 4, 5, 6],
   ic_sets : intersection(X, Y, Z).
X = X{[2, 3] \/ ([] .. [1, 4]) : _2127{2 .. 4}}
Y = Y{[3, 4] \/ ([] .. [5, 6]) : _2222{2 .. 4}}
Z = Z{[3] \/ ([] .. [4]) : _2302{[1, 2]}}
There are 6 delayed goals.
Yes (0.00s cpu)
Note that we needed to qualify the intersection/3 constraint with the ic_sets module prefix because of a name conflict with a predicate from the lists library of the same name.
Note the lack of a complement constraint: this is because the complement of a finite set is infinite and cannot be represented. Complements can be modelled using an explicit universal set and a difference constraint.

Finally, there are a number of n-ary constraints that apply to lists of sets: disjointness, union and intersection. For example:

all_disjoint(+Sets)
Sets is a list of integers sets which are all disjoint
all_union(+Sets, ?SetUnion)
SetUnion is the union of all the sets in the list Sets
all_intersection(+Sets, ?SetIntersection)
SetIntersection is the intersection of all the sets in the list Sets


Figure 10.4: N-ary Set Relations




?- intsets(Sets, 5, 1, 5), all_intersection(Sets, Common).
Sets = [_2079{([] .. [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) : _2055{0 .. 5}}, ... ]
Common = Common{([] .. [1, 2, 3, 4, 5]) : _3083{0 .. 5}}
There are 24 delayed goals.
Yes (0.00s cpu)
In most positions where a set or set variable is expected one can also use a set expression. A set expression is composed from ground sets (integer lists), set variables, and the following set operators:

Set1 /\ Set2       % intersection
Set1 \/ Set2       % union
Set1 \ Set2        % difference
When such set expressions occur, they are translated into auxiliary intersection/3, union/3 and difference/3 constraints, respectively.


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